The Role of a ‘Role Model’

When I was growing up, I didn’t have any role models in my circle of family and friends – folks who had achieved the heights of success in their professional lives, and could serve as a guiding path to those who are just starting out on their journey.

I had to overcome several obstacles and navigate uncharted waters, to graduate from one of the top colleges of the country (St. Xavier’s) with honors. Soon after a brief stint in Sales, I pursued a Business Management degree in Marketing, and once again, found myself with more questions than answers. Once more, there was hardly any one I could personally approach to seek guidance from, in terms of the significant life choices that lay ahead…

Should I join a small firm (with a wider exposure to work) or a large, well-known brand (with a much smaller role in it)? Will industry X have better growth prospects than industry Y? If I wish to ultimately head a function or department, what’s the best path to it? What does one actually do in senior roles in a mid-large size organization?

Do bear in mind that this was circa 1990-1998, well before the Internet had democratised information access for all.

Even in later years, as my awareness of the world improved and I had better access to organizational resources, there were many questions I faced as a young professional. In these situations, I wished it was possible to seek help from other, more experienced, role models.

The sad reality is that, even with all the information we want, now available at our fingertips, some of these answers are still hard to come by.

If we come from privileged backgrounds or families, we don’t quite realize how hard it is for many folks to get good advice, or shape their career paths & aspirations on the lines of senior (and successful) professionals that can ‘show them the way’.

This post is an attempt to fill some of those gaps.

As someone who has experienced organizations of all shapes and sizes, and worked across many functions, I am often asked for advice from students and junior colleagues. I do what I can to encourage and address those questions to the best of my abilities. That’s a big part of why I teach as Visiting Faculty in business schools, and occasionally take up a budding, young professional to mentor him/her through a difficult phase.

I urge you folks to do the same – use every opportunity to help others who are struggling to find answers to the tough questions. Speak to young professionals (and students) regularly. Ask questions, so you can understand their reality better. Encourage questions, so you can help them navigate their dilemmas. Make some time for this in your busy lives, even if it means weekends, so you can be accessible to them.

If you are past 50 years of age, seriously consider ‘reverse mentoring’ in your organization to stay in touch with changing realities – it will only enrich your own Life and perspective. If you are in a desk job, take the opportunity to get out more and interact with your channels & customers – it will give them a chance to reach you. If you have forgotten your modest beginnings, take a moment to remind yourself where you came from and what you used to struggle with – it will enable you to offer help in a way that is relevant to others.

Providing jobs is not the only way to help people. And, you don’t have to be a CxO to be able to offer good advice. Every one can make a difference – we only have to commit ourselves to it.

2020 is behind us… It’s time to set some worthy goals and get cracking, don’t you think?

The Crisis Is Here

At the time of writing this, the #Coronavirus pandemic has already claimed more than 1 Million deaths and infected more than 54 Million people, worldwide. Countless lives (and livelihoods) have already been affected by the #Covid19 virus, and most of the year 2020 has really been all about dealing with the crises.

Could we have done more?

Yes, having virtual meetings using a video-calling service like Zoom or Teams is now the de facto way we work. But the way we conduct these meetings is broken, and adds to the strain of hard-working #WFH employees.

Yes, students now attend virtual classes using a mobile device (or two) coupled with a home broadband connection. But, not every child has access to this kind of infrastructure, on demand.

Yes, governments in every country have been working overtime to balance the health and safety of their citizens with the needs of the economy. But, the best way forward is still elusive.

The testing is not standardized, the protocols are not uniform across countries, the economic constraints are not the same from one region to another. And, when the vaccine comes, there will be added pressure on governments to find the right way to distribute it among the population at large.

We could have learnt from each other, instead of reinventing the wheel. We could have joined forces, instead of fighting our battles like a divided people

Technology giants could have combined efforts to help enable infrastructure for children who need to attend online classes. Large corporations could have re-imagined ways of working that are more conducive to virtual/remote presence. Politicians could have learned from politicians (and scientists) in other countries, what really works and what doesn’t.

Instead, some of us got busy coping with the demands of work-from-home, while others used the time to learn some new recipes, enroll in a few certificate courses or see more cat videos online.

Remember those end-of-the-world movies in which the Earth is facing a global crisis of epic proportions, and a coalition force (led by America) finally saves the day?! Hollywood writers would have us believe that when it really came down to it, the citizens of the world would unite to fight a common enemy, and ultimately triumph.

Well, that crisis is here. And, it’s not too late to take corrective action.

Or, is it?

Day 100 – Learning to Adapt

It is now 100 days since the #Covid19 lockdown first began in India.

A lot has happened since then…

We learned to #WFH, and to cope with the “new normal”.

We dealt with Technology challenges, and tried to find a quiet space in our homes – with a charging point nearby.

We coped with ever-changing rules and regulations in our cities, while running out of essentials in our neighbourhoods.

We managed year-end performance appraisals and organizational restructurings. And downsizings.

We learnt to celebrate our special occasions on Microsoft Teams and Zoom calls.

What most of us thought would only last weeks, is running well into the second-half of 2020.

But, we are coping. And learning. And thriving.

Yes, every situation is unique. Every city has its own problems. Every country is struggling to deal with the pandemic in its own ways.

Yes, the harshness (and necessity) of the #lockdown in India may not quite compare with that in Sweden or New Zealand.

But, we humans have an almost infinite capacity to adjust… and adapt.

So, we adapt, we must…

I am grateful to have a team at work that is committed and capable – it makes my day go a little bit easier.

I am grateful for the love and support of my family – it helps me keep the faith.