The Crisis Is Here

At the time of writing this, the #Coronavirus pandemic has already claimed more than 1 Million deaths and infected more than 54 Million people, worldwide. Countless lives (and livelihoods) have already been affected by the #Covid19 virus, and most of the year 2020 has really been all about dealing with the crises.

Could we have done more?

Yes, having virtual meetings using a video-calling service like Zoom or Teams is now the de facto way we work. But the way we conduct these meetings is broken, and adds to the strain of hard-working #WFH employees.

Yes, students now attend virtual classes using a mobile device (or two) coupled with a home broadband connection. But, not every child has access to this kind of infrastructure, on demand.

Yes, governments in every country have been working overtime to balance the health and safety of their citizens with the needs of the economy. But, the best way forward is still elusive.

The testing is not standardized, the protocols are not uniform across countries, the economic constraints are not the same from one region to another. And, when the vaccine comes, there will be added pressure on governments to find the right way to distribute it among the population at large.

We could have learnt from each other, instead of reinventing the wheel. We could have joined forces, instead of fighting our battles like a divided people

Technology giants could have combined efforts to help enable infrastructure for children who need to attend online classes. Large corporations could have re-imagined ways of working that are more conducive to virtual/remote presence. Politicians could have learned from politicians (and scientists) in other countries, what really works and what doesn’t.

Instead, some of us got busy coping with the demands of work-from-home, while others used the time to learn some new recipes, enroll in a few certificate courses or see more cat videos online.

Remember those end-of-the-world movies in which the Earth is facing a global crisis of epic proportions, and a coalition force (led by America) finally saves the day?! Hollywood writers would have us believe that when it really came down to it, the citizens of the world would unite to fight a common enemy, and ultimately triumph.

Well, that crisis is here. And, it’s not too late to take corrective action.

Or, is it?

Day 100 – Learning to Adapt

It is now 100 days since the #Covid19 lockdown first began in India.

A lot has happened since then…

We learned to #WFH, and to cope with the “new normal”.

We dealt with Technology challenges, and tried to find a quiet space in our homes – with a charging point nearby.

We coped with ever-changing rules and regulations in our cities, while running out of essentials in our neighbourhoods.

We managed year-end performance appraisals and organizational restructurings. And downsizings.

We learnt to celebrate our special occasions on Microsoft Teams and Zoom calls.

What most of us thought would only last weeks, is running well into the second-half of 2020.

But, we are coping. And learning. And thriving.

Yes, every situation is unique. Every city has its own problems. Every country is struggling to deal with the pandemic in its own ways.

Yes, the harshness (and necessity) of the #lockdown in India may not quite compare with that in Sweden or New Zealand.

But, we humans have an almost infinite capacity to adjust… and adapt.

So, we adapt, we must…

I am grateful to have a team at work that is committed and capable – it makes my day go a little bit easier.

I am grateful for the love and support of my family – it helps me keep the faith.

Day 28 – The Fight Continues

It’s only been a few months since I took up a new role at Aegon Life. Just a couple of weeks after joining Aegon, India launched a strict #lockdown protocol in response to the #Covid19 pandemic. Originally meant to last 21 days, it has now been extended in its second phase.

When the office moved to a work-from-home setup, I began a series of emails to address the extended team every week or so. The idea was to engage with them, thank them (and their families) for their continued dedication and hard work, and share with them helpful information from time to time.

Covid-19 is surely making a significant impact on India and the world. And, will probably change dynamics for a long time to come. But it doesn’t have to be all bad news. Does it?

Here are a few links from my emails that you may also find useful…

Lessons from Covid-19 that can make the world a better place:

https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/politics-and-nation/view-lessons-from-covid-19-can-make-the-world-a-better-place/articleshow/75130671.cms

5 critical money lessons taught by the Covid-19 crisis:

https://www.financialexpress.com/money/5-critical-money-lessons-taught-by-the-covid-19-crisis/1934945/

Last week, the world also saw a global virtual concert in support of the WHO that featured performances from multiple celebrities and has raised over $127Mn. You may be able to view it online if you missed the broadcast. Alternatively, try this link:

https://www.voot.com/shows/one-world-together-at-home/1/936639/a-global-salute-to-the-real-heroes/936885

And, 8 Lessons from the Army on Leading Remotely during a Lockdown:

https://www.business-standard.com/article/economy-policy/leading-remotely-lessons-from-the-army-120040200301_1.html

We are all learning to navigate the “new normal”. And it’s hard to stay cooped-up inside the house (especially in the India context), deal with daily home needs, and continue to deliver on work.

If you can find some ways to make it easier for the folks you interact with, I’d strongly urge you to do so.

We could all do with a helping hand, especially in times of crisis. Let’s do our best to help out those we can. Shall we?