Designing Processes That Work

When you start designing a process, what do you aim for?

You might think the answer is obvious, but it’s not. A process can try to be the most efficient at what it’s doing (speed/time/cost), or robust enough to handle exceptions with grace (think: moments of truth), or just be a “process” – a set of rules, where none existed before.

The tradeoffs we choose, matter…

A text message might be the best solution for one situation because it’s instant, easily digestible, cheap and convenient.

However, a hand-written thank-you note on high-quality paper, FedEx’ed overnight from the other side of the world is way more effective than an email because of the discretionary effort and expense involved.

… But most improvements are neither efficient enough to be noticeably more effortless than alternatives, nor inefficient in a way that conveys discretionary effort, thoughtfulness or attention to detail.

Matt Watkinson, LinkedIn

I’ve seen many organizations put words like ‘Customer First’ in their Vision and Values posters. Some even commit resources to the CX function, by staffing up a team dedicated to improving Customer Experience, and then asking them to lead a bunch of initiatives. But, when it comes down to it, most enterprises lack a clear understanding of what it means to do right by the customer.

And, unless that clarity informs the design of the processes inside, chances are the people that work there will only be able to do so much.

It’s not just CX – every function can benefit from doing this right. Here’s how you should ideally approach it…

Step 1 – Articulate clearly what you are trying to maximize for
Step 2 – Define when and how to deploy exception handling
Step 3 – Design your processes to accommodate both the above
Step 4 – Communicate this design to the people entrusted with delivery

Without it, a process is just another process.

With it, you get a powerful engine that helps you get closer to your goals.

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