Building Organizations That Scale

Have you heard of the ‘King of Murud Janjira’? Nope?

According to a Wikipedia entry:

Janjira State was a princely state in India during the British Raj, located on the Konkan coast in the present-day Raigad district of Maharashtra.

Its rulers were a Sidi dynasty of Arab Abyssinian (Habesha) descent. The state included the towns of Murud and Shrivardhan, as well as the fortified island of Murud-Janjira, just off the coastal village of Murud, which was the capital and the residence of the rulers.

How about the ‘King of India’? Still no?

Yes, I know India is now a democratic nation and has a modern governing structure. But, what about in the days gone by? Sure, India had countless nawabs, princes and other rulers for its provinces and states. But, how did that benefit our resource-rich, culture-rich nation? History teaches us that we were repeatedly plundered by invaders across the world, and ruled by others for nearly 200 years with strategies like ‘divide-and-rule’.

Now, think about the way typical organizations are structured.

Departmental silos abound. Incentives are provided for individual achievement, or at most, a small team’s effort. If one business unit or region implements a novel idea, it is often regarded as unacceptable for others to simply copy-paste it and execute as-is. Basically, everyone agrees that  at least “some creativity” ought to be incorporated while adopting someone else’s idea in your unit, not just resorting to “shameless copying”!

In other words, every one wants to be the “King”, but of their own small kingdom.

Surely, such an organization will spend at least some of its energy fighting internal battles and motivating its employee base. Such an organization will find it difficult to standardize its operations, or achieve scale. Such an organization is likely to get overtaken by unforeseen threats, when it finds itself least prepared.

Think about that for a minute. If you are in a position of leadership or an entrepreneur, what kind of an organization are you building? If not, what kind of a leader are you following?

 

This post was inspired by a meeting with an industry leader of repute, who raised some interesting questions in a business review.

Service Standards in Public Service

I recently posted a tweet after a visit to the local post office:

A visit to the local #postoffice (to pick up a missed courier delivery) will put to rest any doubts you may have on how the #public #service machinery operates in #India in the year 2018!

I had purposely worded it in a way that did not make it too obvious if my “experience” was positive or negative. I wanted to see the kind of responses it elicits. And, it looked like my approach worked!

Here are some snippets from some of the comments that ensued…

“Similar sentiment when i went to cash out Kisan Vikas Patra”.

“Not sure if there is a sarcasm in your post. I have very good experience with Chennai Posts.”.

“… In South India, I would not trust large public hospitals, that are indeed one way ticket to hell or heaven. But I owe my life to three public hospitals in Delhi – Lohia, Safdarjung and AIIMS. BTW – private enterprises in the health care have no less horror stories to offer.”.

My own experiences with the Post Office, and the public service machinery in general, have been quite disappointing, to say the least. Of course, there are pockets of excellence in every field, and public services would not be an exception to that rule. But, public services, in general, are often characterized by poor pay and appalling work conditions (as compared to their private counterparts). The question is: Does that give them a license to lower their standards below acceptable levels?

Yes, I am also cognizant of the pathetic experiences I periodically encounter with private enterprise: The only consolation in those is that at least it is not my tax money at work. More importantly, when it comes to most private enterprise services, one has the ability to simply walk away and choose another service provider. Often, that is not an option when one encounters a public service.

As one commenter added, “Most of us in metro cities have better choices in almost every aspect of our life’s needs (education, health, food, transportation, communication, clothing, housing, etc.). Just consider the plight in hinterlands… Also, the ones which have no choice… Police, Civic Administration… May God Be With Them.”

Does it always have to be like that?

I think the key lies in understanding that the ones that need to use such services the most, are often the ones that have no other choice.

When designing a public service, bureaucrats, government officials and public servants would do well to remember that context, so that they can empathize with the “customer” needs that the service aims to ultimately address. The less privileged among us deserve a good standard of essential services. Public transport, education, healthcare and communication are all included in that list.

Enrique Peñalosa, the Mayor of Bogotá, captured it eloquently when he remarked, “A developed country is not a place where the poor have cars. It’s where the rich use public transportation.

Travelling Abroad 101

This post was also published on HotFridayTalks.com

Who doesn’t like to travel? Our glossy magazines and social media feeds seem to be filled with pictures of people in exotic locales across the world. And let’s not forget the steady diet of Switzerland and Canada in our Bollywood films! But, if you haven’t yet left desi shores to travel outside India – I mean, ever – it can all get a bit intimidating.

No worries, this post might help you master the basics and make the transition a pleasant one…

Visas

First things first! If you are an Indian traveller going abroad, you will find that most places will require a visa, which typically means documentation and visa fees. Some countries also require explicit permission letters from the destination country as a part of the application process, while others involve in-person interviews that may or may not be scheduled in your city of residence. That said, there are also a few countries that are relatively easier to access via simple visa formalities or even visa-on-arrival. So, do some research online (or through your preferred travel agent) to learn what it takes before you zero-in on the destination. Of course, visas get stamped on passports. So make sure you have one that doesn’t expire in the next 6 months.

Getting By

Most popular cities have traffic congestion during peak hours on popular routes – way worse than you can imagine. Thankfully, most popular destinations also have cheap, fast alternatives to help tourists (and locals) get around. These include Rapid Transit systems like the MRT or SkyTrains popular across South East Asia, with many major international airports also connected to the city center through an Airport Express system. Bear in mind that in some cities, it may cost you nearly as much as hailing a cab (for a group of 4), but you’ll save a significant amount of time not being stuck in traffic.

Connectivity

Carry your India SIM for emergency, but ask for a local SIM (destination country) as a prepaid card for your second slot. You can even carry a spare handset if you don’t have a dual-SIM phone. You will find that most travel destinations have very attractive short-term offers for calling, data and messaging on prepaid plans, aimed at visiting tourists. You may need to show your passport to get a connection.


“The world is a book, and those who don’t travel only read one page.”
Augustine of Hippo


Sights & Sounds

When it comes to taking in the sights, tourist-friendly destinations have a lot to offer. Unlike most places in India, you may not save much money by showing up at the venue and buying the ticket there. Online ticket websites and travel desks of popular hotels may charge you the same (original) price, and include free transport to and from your hotel. Ask around to figure out what works better.

Shopping

At most popular malls in tourist-friendly cities, there will often be a designated place/exit/gate where you can queue up for taxis that take you back to your hotel. The queues may be long during peak hours, but are the quickest way to get a cab, unless you have a vehicle on standby.

Lost?

Many hotels I have stayed in across the world have “contact cards” at the reception with the hotel’s contact details, a tiny map and the address printed in the local language and in English. Pick up some copies from the hotel desk, and carry them with you, especially if you are travelling to a city where the locals may not speak/understand English. It will help you re-trace your steps back to the hotel from an unfamiliar location. On that note, it is also a good idea to carry a print of some emergency numbers like the nearest local hospital, the Indian embassy, etc. for those times when unforeseen events happen.

Respect

Last but not the least, remember to conduct yourself in a manner that is appropriate and respectful of local customs. Some countries also prescribe what is appropriate (and not appropriate) to wear for ladies, or inside their temples of worship, or on the palace grounds of the reigning monarch. Other cities have very strict rules about what is permitted through customs or what is allowed (and not allowed) as a part of their traffic regulations. Read a little about what’s ok and what’s not, so you are on the right side of the law. And, don’t forget to set a good impression for your country, when you’re in a foreign land!

Enjoy your travels…

Startup India: Taking Stock

Last month, Mint did a feature on Hits and Misses in the Indian Startup universe. It was a great opportunity to take stock of reality, since most of what we read about in the mainstream media is a function of “survivorship bias”. Here are some interesting statistics from that story…

  • The E-commerce sector alone has raised over $11 billion over the past decade – roughly 75% of the funds that have been raised by Indian start-ups during that period
  • Of the $11 billion, Flipkart Internet Pvt. Ltd has raised more than $4.5 billion, and is now India’s most valuable Internet company at $11.6 billion
  • The top five most-funded start-ups in E-commerce to have shut down had raised $51.1 million in total, which doesn’t include the distress sales of companies such as Letsbuy and SherSingh
  • $3.1 billion (including debt) was raised by Digital Payment startups, making Paytm – now valued at $7 billion – India’s second-most valuable Internet company
  • Of the 192 companies founded in the Cab Hailing category since 2007, 76 have shut shop; Ola is currently valued at $3.5 billion
  • Nearly 310 start-ups in Healthcare, of 2,678 founded since 2007, have shut shop; Practo, 1MG, Portea are the top startups in this segment
  • As many as 2,460 ventures in the Edu-tech / Education space incorporated since 2007; about 224 have shut down
  • Of the 2,420 start-ups founded in Hyperlocal (home services+food tech+delivery) since 2007, 780 have shut shop
  • As many as 514 ventures tried group buying model one way or the other, but at least 221 shut shop

Think about those statistics for a moment; There are plenty of lessons to learn from. Here are some of my personal takeaways…

  1. A healthy dose of funding was available to those who ventured out and attempted to create an organization of value
  2. The best known in each segment typically finds it a bit easier to gain preferred access to investors, markets and customers, simply by virtue of their size and brand salience
  3. Path-breaking, innovative ideas executed well are not the only recipe for success; Addressing a customer gap with great execution at a profitable price point can work wonders too!
  4. Despite significant resources at their disposal, and addressing a real customer need, countless startups did not survive the past decade

For some of you dreaming of launching a startup, posts like these may signify doom and gloom. For others, it will probably provide the inspiration to soldier through.

The fact is, not every venture is meant to succeed and not every startup will fail. “There is nothing in a caterpillar that tells you it’s going to be a butterfly“, said R. Buckminster Fuller. For me, the biggest lesson buried in these statistics is that building a successful organization takes decades, not years. There is simply no shortcut to it.

The IndiaStack Framework

Typically, when we think of government-run initiatives in India, a certain image comes to mind – one that leaves a lot to be desired. But, India is changing. And, changing fast. Yes, most of us know about initiatives like Aadhaar. But, that’s not all there is to it.

A few months ago, I wrote about India’s Digital Divide in a post that covered my visit to some Community Information Resource Centers (CIRCs) that were empanelled with the National Digital Literacy Mission. In it, I captured my experience of interacting with the Digital Empowerment Foundation (DEFIndia.org), and with the fine folks that work at the grassroot level, ensuring that underprivileged communities in semi-urban and rural India get access to Information Technology and to the essentials skills needed to make it work.

As it turns out, there is lot more where that came from. While leading dailies are busy covering Karan Johar’s adoption on their front pages, the government – yes, the government! – has been quietly working on a digital framework over the past several years, to enable a variety of “digital services” for its citizens.

The “IndiaStack“, as it is now known, is a collection of APIs that “allows governments, businesses, startups and developers to utilise a unique digital Infrastructure to solve problems towards presence-less, paperless, and cashless service delivery”. The seeds were sown way back in 2009 with the creation of UIDAI (Aadhaar), but the form it takes today is a robust, interoperable framework that works across devices and service providers. The IndiaStack APIs include Aadhaar, eSign, eKYC, Digital Locker, Unified Payment Interface and a host of other services ranging from Electronic Toll Collection to Bharat Bill Payment System – all designed to make it easier for the common man to go about their business. It even includes a specification for Electronic Consent that puts the user at the center of the data flow as well as content flow. Imagine, a government initiative doing all this!

The benefits of adopting such a framework are immense for the urban as well as rural masses. To take an example, a large bank can use a combination of Aadhaar + eKYC + eSign + Digital Locker to reduce Customer Onboarding time from days to hours, thereby reducing drop-offs, minimizing branch operation costs and practically eliminating the need for a backoffice. Reliance Jio used such a setup recently to onboard 100 Mn+ customers in less than 3 months, with less than 10 minutes per customer (vs 1 day or more for other telcos), and at a cost of less than Rs. 3 per new customer (vs Rs. 40 or more for other telcos). “Walk Out Working” is the new benchmark for the user journey, and it’s great news for all customers.

The technology is not just for the mass affluent customers in Top 10 metros, though. As more and more service providers build services around these APIs, the unbanked and underserved communities of India will be able to use elements of the IndiaStack to push & pull payments (UPI), share their own data (e.g. prepaid recharge history) with relevant entities, and access lending credit (e.g. a one-day or one-month loan) that was unavailable to them until now.

Aadhaar is not just another identity card – it offers a platform that can verify more than 100 Mn transactions a day, in real-time. UPI is not just a fun way to build a virtual payment address – it can enable push/pull transactions from any stored value account to any other store value account. And, Digital Locker is not just another storage service – it is a full-fledged data exchange platform to offer secure access to users in a multi-provider ecosystem. Finally, many of these tools work across devices, not just on smartphones- making them available to the audiences they were designed for.

If understood correctly, and used efficiently, this digital framework has the power to transform lives at the grassroot level, bringing hundreds of millions of people within the ecosystem, and offering them the tools they need to improve their socio-economic reality. And, the technology is available today, in the form of interoperable, scalable APIs, ready to plug-and-play.

After all, India is more than a tony suburb in Mumbai or a startup hotspot in Koramangala. India does not always speak English or get 24×7 electricity. But, India is eager to learn… hungry to grow. And thankfully, these new tools are a step in the right direction, in making India data-rich and well-connected.

India – Three Countries

A few days ago, Founding Fuel posted a cogent piece by Haresh Chawla on How India’s digital economy can rediscover its mojo. In it, Chawla speaks about the current crisis of confidence surrounding the digital economy and the so-called unicorns. It’s a great piece on the realities of the startup mania, and has a lot to offer to many of us – regardless of the role we play in the ecosystem. What was most intriguing for me, however, was Chawla’s thoughts on how India is not just a huge mass of consumers as many in the western world mistakenly assume. Here’s how he articulates it…

 

India One: Club the top 2-tiers above and you find that the top 15% of Indians, i.e. about 150-180 million, earning an average of Rs 30,000 per month, are the ones who have money left over after buying necessities. These 15% of Indians control over half the spending power of the economy and almost its entire discretionary spending.

India Two: This is the middle 30% or 400-odd million Indians, earning an average of Rs 7,000 a month… They are the ones who “service” the $1 trillion market (yes, read that again) that India One represents… Of course, we report them as internet consumers in our slick presentations on Startup India.

India Three: These are the forgotten 650 million who subsist and don’t have the money to buy two square meals. Their incomes rival that of sub-Saharan Africa… However, they are the ones who form our vote banks and determine the political future of our nation.

 

Think about that for a minute. Yes, as Indians, we all know that there are huge disparities in the wealth that surrounds us. And that is unlikely to change in the short term. But to think of India in terms of “three countries” puts things in perspective, doesn’t it?

If I had a dollar for every time someone told me they were thinking of “building an app” as a path to striking it rich…

Of course, it is a silly notion to think that one app – any app – makes for a healthy and sustainable business model. And I’m sure the marketplace will address such misplaced notions appropriately, for the most of us who venture into this ‘glamorous’ territory completely uninformed about what lies ahead. But there is a larger issue at play, here.

Even if you don’t intend to start an app project on the side, if you’re reading this, you are most likely a part of the ‘India One’ that Chawla writes about, and therefore, in a position of some influence in Society. You are more likely to be involved in making decisions on behalf of your employers related to the products or services you manage. You are more likely to spend your waking hours in the pursuit of making your product or service available to consumers across categories – India Two and Three included.

Do we really understand the customer we seek to satisfy? Do we know what their world looks like? Do we identify with their trials and tribulations? Or do we assume that their lives more or less resemble our own, except for the fact that they don’t watch Star World or converse in the Queen’s English?

Think about India in terms of three different worlds, and you may just have a greater chance of success when it comes to translating your lofty ideas into success on the ground. After all, understanding your customer’s needs and addressing those needs profitably is the very foundation on which any business is built. Is it not?

The Technological Indian

A few days ago, I had the pleasure of attending a talk by Prof. Ross Bassett of North Carolina State University on the subject of M.I.T. and the Technological Indian. In that lecture, I discovered some surprising facts about the history of Technology in India and at MIT. Here is a small glimpse…

 

During World War II, about 200,000 soldiers came to India, and circa 1945, saw the establishment of the US Office of War Information at Hornsby Street. This also housed the earliest version of the American Library, which was how information on M.I.T. first became available to Indians!

 

Some of India’s best-known industrialists – Adi Godrej, Ramesh Chauhan, Aditya Birla, etc. are M.I.T. graduates; G.D. Birla also pursued senior members at M.I.T. to seek their help in shaping the vision and setup at BITS Pilani

 

Between 1861 and 2000, more than 1,300 Indians graduated from the M.I.T. campus; The first Indian at M.I.T. was Keshav Malhar Bhat from Pune in 1882, after which no other Indian went for the 20 years that followed

 

Lokmanya Tilak’s English weekly – Mahratta – regularly carried features from western publications, thanks to the advent of steamboats and the printing press; As early as April 1884, the Kesari (published in Marathi) wrote an editorial on the need for an “industrial school” in India to be modeled on the lines of the M.I.T. campus, even though the M.I.T. model was not yet fully demonstrated in the US!

 

Mahatma Gandhi was also associated with several Indian students who went to M.I.T., including penning a recommendation for a few that sought financial aid.

 

The modern computer was also created to a large extent at M.I.T. between 1946 and 1970

 

Finally, TCS, Datamatics, Infosys and other large I.T. giants owe their origins to M.I.T as well, establishing the foundation of the I.T. industry in India!

 

What a fascinating look at Technology through the eyes of a modern historian! Thank you, Prof. Bassett for an enlightening afternoon.

ECommerce in India

ECommerce is booming. And India is where the action is. When stories of “unicorns” (startups with a valuation of more than 1 Bn) are all around us, it helps to take stock of where the industry is at, and where it’s headed.

Here are some statistics from a recent story in the Economic Times on how far the ECommerce industry has come… (I’m skipping valuation and VC money figures, and focusing on customer stats instead)

 

Pregnancy, Birth & Childhood: Online baby care represents <10% of the $10 Bn market, growing at 17% a year; Currently clocks approx. 2,500 daily shipments across three major players

 

Education & Learning: $100 Bn market and booming; Student population rose 28% to 315 Mn in the last decade; However, lack of significant success stories in this arena

 

Grocery: Of the $500 Bn retail market in India, $290 Bn is grocery; Largest player – BigBasket – processes approx. 20,000 orders a day; 1 Mn people order groceries via apps every day, growing at 30% every month

 

Home Services: About 100 services on offer, with 20,000 daily users across the top 5 metros; $100 Mn market size, but challenging in terms of trained manpower and timely delivery

 

Shopping: Top players are diversified managed marketplaces mostly; Less than 2% of the $500 Bn retail market is online – plenty of room for growth; Hyper competition has resulted in heavy discounting and companies are unable to make profits currently; Top players clock >100k shipments a day to about 25k pincodes across India

 

Furniture & Home Decor: Offers high margins (60-70%) and not very susceptible to discounting; Market is pegged at $32 Bn and posied to grow to $70 Bn by 2020; Less than 1% is currently online; Average ticket size is Rs. 18,000; By 2018, online furniture sales is expected to reach $1 Bn

 

Taxi Booking: $10 Bn market size with brutal competition among two leading, disruptive players; Now expanding into courier and delivery services as well; Approx. 1 Mn users book cabs every day via apps in 100+ cities

 

Eating Out: Food ordering is a $15 Bn a year business, with Zomato now operational in 22 countries; Indian players service upto 10,000 orders daily via their apps with a few key players in fierce competition akin to Taxi aggregators

 

Travel & Entertainment: E-Ticketing is one of the most penetrated with 40% of rail tickets via IRCTC; Hotels and airline tickets are increasingly booked online; Huge opportunity to connect with wallet and other partners to add value

 

Assets, Properties & Cars: Tata Housing sold flats worth Rs. 50 crores online; Property is an overcrowded space, and used cars is a booming opportunity; New car sales still happen mostly through showrooms

 

Wallet & Bill Payment: New licences issued by RBI to 11 banks recently; Market size for mobile wallet is Rs. 350 crores, expected to grow to Rs. 1,200 crores by 2019; PayTM – the largest player – has 100 Mn users with an average wallet size of Rs. 350

 

Refurbished & Used Goods: Market estimated at $15 Bn; Platforms enable about 2 Mn transactions a month with an approx. GMV of $4 Bn

 

Social Networking & Jobs: India has the second-largest user base for almost all key social platforms; At 350 Mn internet users, India still has a long way to go for 100% penetration; Facebook has >110 Mn users in India; LinkedIn has become an alternate to job portals

 

Healthcare: Diagnostics alone is a $15 Bn market, and the overall healthcare opportunity is $100 Bn; Every month 20 Mn users book 20,000+ appointments via apps, but presence remains mostly limited to large cities

 

Insurance & Retirement Planning: Online term products cheaper by almost 35%, but only 2% of the business has gone online; PolicyBazaar sells about 40,000 policies every month

 

Others: Lingerie worth nearly $30 Mn is sold online; Lenskart ships >1,000 spectacles a day; The domestic gems & jewellery market is Rs. 1.2 lakh crore, while the lingerie market is approx. Rs. 4,000 crore, but less than 1% has gone online

Here are some more statistics from Mint…

Power: $68 Bn – GDP loss estimated due to electricity shortage across India

Infrastructure: $10 Bn – Traffic congestion costs per year

Healthcare: 1 doctor per 1,700 people currently

Financial Inclusion: 120 Mn households without a bank account

 

Startup Statistics:

  • Approx. 80-85k currently employed’ 3-4 startups born each day
  • $4.9 Bn investments made in 2015
  • 65+ M&A deals; 110+ incubators/accelerators; 290+ active angels; 155+ active VCs/PEs
  • 4,200-4,400 startups currently in India – 3rd highest after US & UK
  • $2.5-2.7 Mn is the average valuation of startups of which 13-15% are in ecommerce
  • 28 is the average age of startup founders

For some of you, these numbers may prove that the market is already saturated, while others may see an opportunity for growth. Whichever way you look at it, exciting times are afoot!

Note: Source of data – Various industry estimates as reported in Economic Times and Mint.

The New Gold Rush

 

The time is right, they say.
Any one and every one is launching a startup.
In fact, billion-dollar valuations are fast-becoming the norm! Just look at Flipkart and Snapdeal…

 

Like most of you, we too are bombarded each day by the media focused on the runaway success of startups and entrepreneurs. Any one with half a bright idea seems to want to cash-in. Feeding the frenzy is the (often mistaken) notion that if smart folks (read: VCs) are investing billions of dollars (yes, billions with a B!) in these business enterprises, they must be doing something right.

Well, yes and no.

Let’s take a look at some of the numbers, as reported in a recent article in the Economic Times…

  • Flipkart was valued at $1 Bn in Aug 2012, and is valued today at $11 Bn
  • Snapdeal was valued at $200 Mn in Jul 2011, and is valued today at $1850 Mn
  • Zomato was valued at $2.5 Mn in Jul 2010, and is valued today at $660 Mn

Do you think it is possible for any well-managed company in the ecommerce space to provide an incremental “value” of $10 Bn in just two years?! For those of us in India, that means Rs. 60,000 crores!!! In two years. And, that’s just with one “startup”. (As a reference, currently, the market cap of ACC is jut over half of that.)

Yes, many of these organizations have capable managerial teams, exemplary leadership, and the ability to scale. No doubt about that. But, it may well be a myth for us to assume that these valuations represent the true worth of their business.

Here is what we’ve understood of the Venture Capital business: When a seed fund invests in a new idea, its goal is to take it to the next round of financing (Series A), and make healthy returns on its investment. This story continues in successive rounds of financing, until the logical end is reached – Initial Public Offer (IPO), where folks like you and me literally “buy” into the dream of raking in a small share of the future profits, by buying shares in the company. That’s how the game works. Nothing wrong with that, as long you understand the mechanics.

However, things start falling apart when any one and their cousin imagines overnight success by converting an idea into a “billion dollar firm” within a year. Another fallout is that, inevitably, some businesses miss out on “investor love” and fall by the wayside, despite having a competent team and business model in place. When you think about it, how different is TaxiForSure from Ola Cabs? Or Infibeam from Flipkart? But, now that we know the dozens of zeroes added to their valuations, it’s kinda difficult to see them in the same light as their distant cousins.

Sumanth Raghavendra, Founder, Deck App Technologies sums it up well: “Valuation is ultimately a vanity metric – something startups can brag about, but it is far from a reflection of a company’s true worth.

Yes, in the short run, customers benefit by the discount mania prevalent on such services, and it is not uncommon for funded startups chasing higher levels of growth to offer their products and services below cost. That means, at a loss. But, Growth can only serve as a substitute for Revenue upto a point.

Ultimately, any organization will need to deliver exceptional value (not valuation) to its customers, to survive, sustain and succeed.

P.S. If you run a fledgling startup, or aspire to do so soon, our advice would be to reign in those zeroes and focus on getting the basics right.

Bombay to Udaipur

In April 2011, we embarked on our first “long drive” from Bombay to Goa. In May 2012, we once again attempted the same trip, this time older and wiser. Then, came some months of back trouble, which reached such a low that I did not think I would drive again. However, having made a full recovery this year, high on the agenda was a drive to Udaipur…

I was told by friends who had done it before that the Bombay to Udaipur journey is longer than Goa (approx. 800 kms each way, instead of about 650 kms), but easier to do. In any case, we decided to make the most of the road trip, and not stress about reaching Udaipur before sun down. So we planned a halt at Vadodara, both ways.

That turned out to be a good decision since Vadodara is a nice, clean city that resides roughly halfway to Udaipur. You also have the option of breaking journey at Ahmedabad, which is roughly an hour’s drive further north from Vadodara.

Here is the log from our trip… Bear in mind that, depending on your starting point, milestones may vary by 3-4 kms. Also, our goal was to enjoy the journey, not just the destination. Therefore, these logs will reflect that attitude in the stops we made.

  • Departure @ 6.10 am from Powai, Odo set to 0 kms
  • Stopped at Kamat’s @ 76kms, 7.45 am for breakfast (30 mins)
  • Other milestones: McDonald’s @ 162 kms, Hotel Tulsi @ 171 kms
  • Sugar and Spice food plaza @ 198 kms with clean loos
  • Other milestones: Sugar and Spice @ 243 kms, McDonald’s @ 262 kms
  • Stopped at Hotel Swagat for lunch @ 276 kms, 1.30 pm (45 mins)
  • Arrived at Vadodara around 3.30 pm, 410 kms
  • Started next morning at 8.15 am, towards Udaipur!
  • Breakfast stop (30 mins), 10.30 am  at the start of Ring Road (Many hotels and loos)
  • Stopped at the Vintage Car Museum (1 hour) @ 519 kms
  • Stopped at Hotel Landmark for lunch at 2pm (Bad loo) @ 175 km before Udaipur i.e. 587 kms from Mumbai
  • Multiple petrol pumps seen soon after crossing the Rajasthan border @ 648 kms
  • Reached Udaipur at 850 kms, 6 pm

On the whole, the roads were smooth and the drive was pleasurable. The journey on the way back was somewhat less eventful…

  • Departure from Udaipur at 6.20 am, Odo set to 0 kms
  • Stopped for breakfast at Hotel Aashirvad, 103 kms, 7.45 am
  • Other milestones: Hotel Ashish @ 122 kms (bigger and better), Hotel Asopalav @ 138 kms (biggest!)
  • At 10 am @ approx. 32 kms before Ahmedabad, we took a detour via Gandhinagar, to visit the Sabarmati Ashram
  • Stopped at the Ashram @ 257 kms
  • Joined the Ahmedabad expressway again @ 270 kms, at 12 pm
  • At 349 kms, 12.50 stopped at a sad food court about 15 kms from Vadodara to fill fuel and reached the city soon after
  • Departed next morning at 7.10 am, 385 kms
  • Breakfast stop (30 min) at 9.05 am at a big food court with nice loos, CCD, etc. @ 507 kms
  • Also, Sugar and Spice @ 560 kms, and a big Kamat’s @ 637 kms
  • Stopped at 12.20 pm at Hotel Ahura (45 mins) for awesome Parsi food @ 691 kms (on opp. side of the road)
  • Reached home (Powai) at 3.10 pm with 810 kms on the odo

The stretch from Udaipur to Vadodara was even better, since the detour via Gandhinagar meant that we bypass the only stretch that has two-way traffic. Driving through Gandhinagar was also an experience worth doing!

A common lament across all my road journeys remains the woefully inadequate facilities we have across the country, when it comes to washrooms and clean water.

A new phenomenon we encountered during our Ahmedabad to Udaipur to Ahmedabad stretch is spotting a number of vehicles that looked clearly ‘lived-in’, and carrying multiple passengers, but without any license plates! So watch out in case you get into an accident with one such dubious vehicle.